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Nearly half of droughts in India may have been influenced by North Atlantic air currents, finds study

Nearly half of droughts in India may have been influenced by North Atlantic air currents, finds study

Nearly half of the droughts that occurred during the Indian summer monsoon season in the past century may have been driven by atmospheric disturbances from the North Atlantic region, finds a new study.

The study was carried out by researchers at the Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (CAOS), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), and it has been published in the research journal, ‘Science’.

More than a billion people depend on the annual Indian summer monsoon, which brings copious rain to large swathes of the country between June and September.

When it fails, and most of the country plunges into drought, the usual suspect is El Nio, a recurring climate event during which abnormally warm equatorial Pacific waters pull moisture-laden clouds away from the Indian subcontinent, according to the study.

But 10 out of 23 droughts that India faced in the past century have occurred during years when El Nio was absent.

Nearly half of droughts in India may have been influenced by North Atlantic air currents, finds study

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